10 awesome probiotic foods and Why to eat them!

The human body contains more foreign microbes than human cells. In fact there are trillions of microbes in your gut alone. However, you also have a healthy microbiome in your mouth, in your eyes and on your skin. That begs the question(s): Are you feeding your little friends properly? Are you eating enough probiotic (microbe) rich food?

You may ask why you need to feed them and, if you have so many, why eat more? These are all good questions. The chances are that you are indeed feeding them, but, if fed the wrong thing, certain microbes can become overgrown and take over, causing negative symptoms including: fatigue, brain fog, digestive distress, sinus infections, and more.

By feeding them the proper, healthy kinds of probiotic foods, you cancel out the overgrowth in favor of a healthy gut population. When this microbiome is in balance, wonderful things can happen.

10 reasons to eat probiotic rich foods

  1. Provide enzymes to aid in digestion– These enzymes are especially helpful for the middle-age diet. Probiotics boost enzyme levels, which decline with age. They also contribute to anti-aging and longevity.
  2. Build a protective barrier along the digestive tract. This barrier prevents leaky gut, which allows larger molecules than normal to pass through, leading to food sensitivities or allergies and even autoimmune disorders.
  3. Produce anti-biotic and anti-viral substances to protect the gut and the body. These substances provide immune protection for the gut and the entire body.
  4. Help lower the pH in the digestive tract. These helpful little bugs produce the short chain fatty acids butyric acid and proprionic acid. “these organic acids lower the ph in the GI tract, making it more acidic which reduces the growth of pathogenic bacteria.”
  5. Nourish and energize the cell lining of the GI Tract – “It is estimated that the gut cells receive 60-70% of their energy from bacterial activity.”
  6. Produce vitamins – This further enhances the nutrition value of the probiotic food.
  7. Eliminates toxins and waste from the colon.
  8. Positively improve mood and aid in depression.
  9. Improved weight loss through reduced balanced microbiome and reduced sugar cravings.
  10. Manage GI disorders – many disorders of the GI tract could be due to an imbalance in the microbiome. Probiotic rich food can help balance the microbiome and bring stability to the GI tract.

10 awesome probiotic rich foods

Now that we know why to eat them, we need to know which foods are best. While you can buy some at the store, it’s always best to make your own, which is easy and inexpensive. I’ll be posting a greek yogurt recipe this Thursday on my KITCHEN BLOG. Also look for a DIY Sauerkraut recipe there next week.

  1. Kefir – This can be either water/coconut water kefir or dairy kefir. Water kefir is a bubbly drink that is often flavored with small amounts of fruit juice. Dairy kefir is simlar to yogurt but with a buttermilk texture. I favor this over yogurt due to the diversity of the microbes in the kefir, which can be anywhere from 10 strains to more than 30. Yogurt typically has only a few.
  2. Sauerkraut – As most of you know, this is fermented cabbage. I highly recommend making your own. Store bought sauerkraut is often pasteurized and contains no microbes. Proper sauerkraut is high in vitamin C, as well as digestive enzymes.
  3. Kombucha – This is a fermented and effervescent black tea. It helps support energy, digestion and liver detoxification.
  4. Yogurt – Most of you will buy this in the store. If you do, I recommend organic yogurt. Make sure the package says “active cultures”
  5. Kvass – I must admit, this one is unfamiliar to me. “Kvass is a traditional fermented beverage having a similar taste to beer. Much like kombucha because of its fermentation process and probiotic benefits, it is commonly made from stale, sourdough rye bread.”
  6. Apple cider vinegar – We’re talking about the raw-unrefined apple cider vinegar, which will often say “with the mother” on the label. ACV is known to help reduce cholesterol, improve insulin sensitivity, and weight loss.
  7. fermented pickles and veggies – Once again, we are talking about proper fermented pickles, not the canned, vinegar pickles in the store. Fermented veggies are packed with healthy probiotics
  8. Traditional buttermilk – or cultured buttermilk. Once again, if you buy buttermilk in the store and it says “cultured buttermilk”, make sure it says “active cultures” on the label.
  9. Miso – Miso is “created by fermenting soybean, barley or brown rice with koji. Koji is a fungus, and the fermentation process takes anywhere from a few days to a few years to complete.” Some of the world’s centenarians eat fermented soy and miso!
  10. Brine-cured olives – Once again, olives are eaten throughout the Mediterranean, home of some of the world’s oldest people! Make sure to choose organic olives from a small company.

Closing thoughts

As I venture into the world of food fermenting, I have discovered how easy and inexpensive it is to make some of the world’s healthiest foods. Remember, food fermenting has been around for 1000’s of years as a way of food preservation. Take time to experiment and find the foods you like best. Your little buggy friends will thank you, and so will your body!

Improve or Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline with Exercise

Love it or hate it, exercise is part of life. I’m on the side of “hate it”. I really don’t like to exercise and usually find any excuse to avoid working out my body, and, as it turns out, my brain as well. Researchers are finding that individuals who are physically fit, and exercise regularly cut the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or dementia in HALF! How’s that for motivation?

What if I’ve never exercised, will it still help?

Alzheimer’s and dementia run in my family and has become a passion of mine, so much so, that I wrote my thesis on the topic. One of the things I’ve recently discovered is your state of physical fitness directly relates to your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. That’s right! A 2018 study, done at the O’Donnell Brain Institute, indicates people with lower fitness levels had weaker “white matter” in the brain, as compared with people with higher fitness levels and thus more susceptible to cognitive decline. The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NUST) studied the medical records of 30,000 middle-age individuals. They found individuals who were physically fit were 50% less likely to develop demential than “less fit” individuals.

What happens if you’re like me, and you hate exercise or are among those that are considered “less fit”? Is it too late? You’ll be happy to know that IT’S NOT TOO LATE!! You’ll reap the brain boosting benefits of exercise even if you haven’t exercised until middle-age or even later. The study at NUST indicated that individuals who began the study “less fit”, but achieved a “physically fit” status during the study, showed the same reduction in the risk of dementia as those who began the study “physically fit”.

What type of exercise is best?

As it turns out, interval aerobics is the best for brain health. Researchers at McMaster University in Ontario tested types of exercises that were most effective act increasing both physical and memory performance in adults 60 years and older. They tested 64 sedentary middle-age men and women, and began by evaluating the fitness level and memory performance of each individual.

The individuals were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1– moderate treadmill walking for 50 minutes 3x/week and group 2– “interval walking; increasing the incline for four minutes to raise heart rates followed by three minutes of easy walking. Then repeat for a total of four rounds of intervals.

The fitness and memory tested were repeated 12 weeks later. Incredibly, only the interval walkers showed improvements in both fitness and memory. The interval walkers, with a greater level of fitness, had improved their memory to a greater extent than the moderate walkers. While any type of movement is good, movement that gets your blood pumping is best for both body and mind.

Closing thoughts…

Jane Fonda once said “It’s never too late – never too late to start over, never too late to be happy.” I guess that’s true with most things in life, even exercise and brain health. Remember, with the right diet and exercise, things can still be turned around. Your life and your memories are worth it.

The Insomnia Fix: The dangers of sleep deprivation

Could you stay awake for 11 days? In 1965, Randy Gardner, a 17-year old high school student stayed awake for 11 days and 24 minutes or 264.4 hours, to study the effects of sleep deprivation. This is the longest documented case of intentional sleep deprivation without stimulants. After just 2 days, Randy struggled to remain focused and found it difficult to identify objects through touch. On day three, he showed signs of moodiness, incoordination and hallucinations. Things went down hill from there. Randy became paranoid and irritable, with trouble concentrating and forming short-term memories. By the final day, Randy had slurred speech, no facial expressions; very short attention span and diminished mental abilities. In fact, the physical and mental effects of Randy’s sleep deprivation test were so extreme and dangerous, that the Guinness Book of Records has stopped listing voluntary sleep deprivation. (3)

While Randy’s experiment is an extreme example, sleep deprivation, insomnia and other sleep disorders are at epidemic proportions. According to the American Sleep Association, between 50 to 70 million adults in the United States suffer from a sleep disorder. Approximately 35% of adults report less than 7 hours of sleep during a 24 hour period. The effects of sleep deprivation are far reaching, including death. There are 100,000 deaths each year in hospitals, due to medical errors, in which sleep deprivation is a contributing factor. So, exactly what is sleep deprivation? What causes it? What are the symptoms or physical effects? These are the questions that will be addressed in this article. (2)

According to the medical dictionary, sleep deprivation is defined as “a sufficient lack of restorative sleep over a cumulative period, so as to cause physical or psychiatric symptoms and affect routine performances of tasks.” (7)  How much sleep is seen as “sufficient”? This depends on age. According to the American Sleep Association, appropriate sleep totals are as follows: (2)

  • Adult: 7 – 9 hours
  • Teenager: 8 – 10 hours
  • Child 6 – 12 years: 9- 12 hours
  • Child 3 – 5 years:  10 – 13 hours
  • Child 1 – 2 years: 11 – 14 hours
  • Infants 4 -12 months: 12 – 16 hours

Why is it that some people sleep well, getting plenty of rest, while others struggle just to fall asleep, much less get 8 solid hours? As it turns out, there are many causes of sleep deprivation. The causes are not simple to isolate and vary from person to person. It can be as simple voluntary deprivation from people who just don’t like to sleep and see it as a waste of time. Other people are simply sleep deprived, unintentionally, due to work, or family obligations. However, in most cases, it is much more complex, and caused by a variety of physical or psychological factors. Psychological factors include stress and depression. There are also a wide ranging number of physical factors including, sleep apnea, hormone imbalance, chronic illness, environmental factors, medicines, improper sleep hygiene and aging. (4,5)

As our mothers and grandmothers told us, we all need our “beauty sleep”.  While there is actual research showing that overtired people appear less attractive to others, the physical and psychological effects of sleep deprivation are much more serious than just skin deep. (11)  There are some basic symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as yawning, moodiness, fatigue, irritability, forgetfulness, inability to concentrate, increased stress, depression, lack of motivation, low libido and difficulty learning. (4,5)  However, the physical effects are actually far reaching, dribbling into many aspects of our physical body. While entire books can be written about the physical effects of sleep deprivation, this article will touch briefly on the most serious ones:

  • Obesity/overeating – Research indicates a direct link between sleep restriction and the ability to regulate weight. (10) Poor sleep quality has also been showm to increase food intake during waking hours. (12)
  • Heart disease – Individuals who are chronically sleep deprived have an increased risk, 33% to 45%, of developing heart disease. (9)
  • Type 2 diabetes – Getting less than 6 hours of sleep per night is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. (8)
  • Alzheimer’s disease/memory loss/brain cell death – An increased accumulation of amyloid plaque was seen in the brains of elderly individuals who were sleep deprived for just one night. Amyloid plaque is one of the main signs of Alzheimer’s disease. (6,9)
  • Impaired immune function – One study showed a direct connection between sleep deprivation and impaired immune responses (13)

Closing thoughts.

Which comes first, the chicken or the egg? There are many researchers who ask this age old question in relation to the physical effects of sleep deprivation. In other words, does sleep deprivation directly cause these serious physical and psychological conditions or do these conditions cause sleep deprivation.? The jury is still out. What is clear is  sleep is a very important part of any health and nutrition regime, and should not be overlooked.

This post was first in a series of monthly articles I am writing, for the Hawthorn University Blog, on insomnia and sleep deprivation. This series will appear, here on my blog, the third Monday each month. Future articles will take an individual look at each one of the physical effects, and delve deeper into the link with sleep deprivation. There will also be articles on the types of insomnia, causes and possible treatments. 

Until next time…Namaste my friends!

Sources

  1. Ackermann, K., Revell, V.L., Lao, O., Rombouts, E.J., Skene, D.J., and Kayser, M., (2012). Diurnal rhythms in blood cell populations and the effect of acute sleep deprivation in healthy young men. DOI: 10.5665/sleep.1954. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754039
  2. American Sleep Association. (2006) Sleep statistics. Retrieved from: https://www.sleepassociation.org/about-sleep/sleep-statistics/
  3. BEC Crew, (2015). Here’s what happened when a teenager stayed awake for 11 days straight. retrieved from: https://www.sciencealert.com/watch-here-s-what-happened-when-a-teenager-stayed-awake-for-11-days-straight
  4. Davis, K. (2018). What to know about sleep deprivation. Retrieved from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/307334#symptoms
  5. Dutta, S.S., (2019). Causes of sleep deprivation. Retrieved from: https://www.news-medical.net/health/Causes-of-Sleep-Deprivation.aspx
  6. Krause, A.J., Simon, E.B., Mander, B.A., Greer, S.M., Saletin, J.M., Goldstein-Piekarski, A.N., and Walker, M.P., (2017) The sleep-deprived human brain. DOI: doi:10.1038/nrn.2017.55. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6143346/pdf/nihms982415.pdf
  7. Medical Dictionary (ND). Sleep deprivation. Retrieved from: https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/sleep+deprivation
  8. Mohammed, A.A., Deepali, J., Sawsan, A.S., Ali, A.M., Sulayma, A., Khalid, A.R., Riyadh, B., Mohammed, H., Khamis, A.H., (2016) Habitual sleep deprivation is associated with type 2 diabetes: A case-control-study. DOI: DOI.10.5001/omj.2016.81 Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5099401/pdf/OMJ-D-16-00011.pdf
  9. Shokri-Kojaria, E., Wanga, G. J., Wiersa, C. E., Demirala, S.B., Sung Won Kima, M.G., Lindgrena, E., Ramireza, V., Zehraa, A., Freemana, C., Millera, G., Manzaa, P, Srivastavaa, T., De Santib, S., Tomasia, D., Benvenistec, H., and Volkowa, N.D., (2017). β-Amyloid accumulation in the human brain after one night of sleep deprivation. Retrieved from: https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/115/17/4483.full.pdf
  10. St. Onge, M.P., (2017). Sleep–obesity relation: underlying mechanisms and consequences for treatment. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12499
  11. Valley Sleep Center (2013). Common wives tales about sleep. Retrieved from:https://valleysleepcenter.com/common-wives-tales-about-sleep/
  12. Zuraikat, F.M., Makarem, N., Lio, M., St.Onge, M.P., and Aggarwal, B., (2020). Measures of poor sleep quality are associated with higher energy intake and poor diet quality in a diverse sample of women from the go red for women strategically focused research network. DOI:  10.1161/JAHA.119.014587 Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7070194/

Middle-Age Wisdom: Healthy snacking habits while working from home – Fox News

Hello all! Forgive me as I write this on my phone. My better half is telecommuting and has my computer at the moment.

Before I share the article, I wanted to give a quick update on some scheduling changes during this covid-19 crisis. I’ve decided to cut back to blogging to just one day per week, for the foreseeable future, until things get back to normal. This is a significant cut back from my current schedule of 4 days per week.

Each Monday, I’ll post 2 articles, one from this blog and one from my recipe blog, The Purple Almond Wellness Kitchen. Since my better half and youngest son are both home everyday, I find myself in a unique opportunity to spend quality time with my family, thus the reason for the cut back. Once things are back to normal, I’m hoping to go full time on both blogs.

Onto the main article:

Many of you find yourselves in a unique situation of working from home. This poses many different challenges, one of which is access to more food than normal. Trust me, as someone who works from home all the time, I understand this challenge all too well….the penchant to snack, mindlessly, all day. How do you stop this? The following article from Fox News gives a few tips on how to resist snacking and eat healthy when working from home.

Snacks Quotes. QuotesGram

Here are a few tips from the article:

  • plan ahead- make snacks ahead of time and place them in clear containers
  • make unique snacks – like fruit skewers with pineapple cubes, orange slices, strawberries, etc
  • Use low-fat, plain yogurt or cottage cheese for dips or breakfast.
  • change work locations if you’re prone to stress eating
  • take a 15 minute break- get some fresh air, chat with friends or play a game on your computer/phone
  • got cravings? Figure out possible reasons and look for solutions

If you fall off track don’t worry. It’s not the end of the world. Just hop back on the healthy eating bandwagon. At the end of the day, it’s overall healthy eating that matters, not one little bad snack.

Until next time, Namaste 🙏 my friends.

For more details, here is the link to the main article: Coronavirus outbreak: How to maintain healthy snacking habits while working from home

Brain Talks: Fighting to remember ~ Phytomelatonin & Alzheimer’s Disease ~ (Part 2)

Did you know…

  • One person in the United States develops Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) every 65 seconds.
  • Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth leading cause of death.
  • 5.8 million Americans are living with AD, with this number expected to reach 14 million by the year 2050.
  • Deaths from AD increased by 145 percent between 2000 to 2017
  • Approximately one in three seniors (65 years or older) die from AD or some form of dementia, more than breast and prostate cancer combined.
  • There is currently NO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT for this devastating disease.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease, see this Brain Talks article: A Beginner’s Guide to Alzheimer’s Disease.

Part of my master’s thesis was showing the benefits of melatonin, in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Last month for Brain Talks, and part 1 of this series, I discussed the benefits of melatonin in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and beyond just that of a sleep hormone. To see that article, follow THIS LINK.

Today, in 2 part. we’ll discuss phytomelatonin (plant based melatonin) and safe supplement sources. Once again, for an in depth explanation into melatonin, benefits of melatonin and effects of melatonin deficiency, see part 1 HERE.

Why you should avoid synthetic

melatonin supplements…

  • Looking for a supplement from a reputable company of good quality is important.
  • As a dietary supplement, synthetic melatonin is unregulated by the FDA. Therefore, actual levels of melatonin, as well as any contaminants, go unchecked.
  • The amount of actual melatonin in supplements is questionable. One study reviewed 31 different brands of Melatonin supplements. The results indicated the actual amount of melatonin in the supplement, differed by a range of -83% to +478% from the amount listed on the label. This makes accurate dosages difficult to determine.
  • Up to 14 contaminants have been found, such as formaldehyde or phthalimide, which is used in pesticides. These are created as a result of the production of synthetic melatonin.
  • Poorly made supplements can cause problems. In 1993, 37 people died and over 1500 were injured from an incurable disease called Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS).
  • This has led scientists to search for healthy alternatives.

What is phytomelatonin?

Phytomelatonin is plant-based melatonin. The molecular structure of phytomelatonin, N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is identical to animal based melatonin (ABM). When scientists realized the many health benefits of melatonin, they began to explore other sources of this powerful hormone. In 1993, plant-based melatonin was first discovered in ivy morning glory and tomatoes . Until that time, melatonin was thought to be a product of the pineal gland in animals only. Over the next few years, melatonin was discovered in tobacco, as well as several edible plants. Since then, several more studies have proven the presence of melatonin in many plant varieties, establishing the fact that melatonin is present in all living beings, with the exception of the potato, which contains no detectable melatonin.

In general, research into the levels of phytomelatonin in plants discovered a wide variety of concentrations. Overall, nuts and seeds, contain the highest concentration of phytomelatonin and fruits contain the lowest. Scientists believe this variation exists due to melatonin’s capacity as an antioxidant and the high levels of oxidizable fats in nuts and seeds.

Best food sources of Phytomelatonin

The table below contains a list of common foods high in phytomelatonin, with the amount measured in picograms per gram (pg/g) of either fresh weight (fw) or dry weight (dw).

Is phytomelatonin a healthy alternative?

Though it is still difficult to find supplements of good quality, phytomelatonin is beginning to emerge into the market. Whole food supplements are the preferred source, such as tart cherries, which most commonly comes as a juice. The question remains: will consuming phytomelatonin foods or supplements, such as tart cherry juice, affect melatonin levels in the body or improve sleep quality?

Research does indicate that consuming foods high in phytomelatonin will increase melatonin levels in the body. One randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study, tested the ability of tart cherry juice (TCJ) concentrate to boost urinary melatonin levels. For seven days, 20 volunteers consumed either TCJ concentrate or the placebo . The TCJ concentrate showed significantly elevated melatonin levels .

Another such study looked at whether TCJ enhanced sleep quality in elderly individuals with insomnia. This was a randomized, double blind, crossover study, in which 15 elderly adults received both the treatment and placebo for 2 weeks, with a 2 week washout period. The tart cherry juice group saw significant improvements in all areas of sleep quality.

While more research is needed, these small studies show the potential of phytomelatonin, through tart cherry supplements, to boost melatonin levels and improve sleep quality

Best whole food melatonin supplements

Access to multiple sources of supplements is important for quality control and price comparison. The recommended dosages, up to twice per day, are 240 milliliters of tart cherry juice, 30 ml of tart cherry juice concentrate or 2 tart cherry extract capsules. Below is a list of phytomelatonin supplements. You can follow the links for information on cost.

Who should use caution when taking melatonin and phytomelatonin supplements?

For the most part, melatonin and phytomelatonin supplements are considered by researchers to be safe. However, there are certain individuals who should use caution when taking melatonin or phytomelatonin. The table below contains a list of counter-indications for melatonin supplementation.

Closing thoughts

As a wellness educator and nutrition nut, I always advocate for whole foods over synthetic supplements. While I believe that synthetic supplements do have their place, in terms of disease treatments and deficiencies, the over all healthy person does not need supplements.

The human body was just not meant to handle these synthetic supplements. One of my professors at Hawthorn, a microbiologist at UCLA, once told me “you only absorb 10% of the nutrients in synthetic supplements”. You are ALWAYS better off with the whole food version of a nutrient. This is why I devoted a large majority of my master’s thesis to this concept. That is why, here in this article, I push whole food melatonin supplements over the synthetic counterparts.

We covered a lot of science in today’s article. Let me know if you have any questions.

Until next time, Namaste my friends!

Tamara

Sources

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5. Feeney, K.A., Hansen, L.L., Putker, M., Olivares-Yanez, C., Day, J., Eades, L., Larrondo, L.F., Hoyle, N.P., O’Neill, J.S., Van Ooijen, G., (2016). Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance. Nature.DOI: 10.1038/nature17407

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Nutrition 101: A Beginner’s Guide to the Anti-Aging Okinawa Diet

This week, I’ve been discussing longevity and places around the world with the most centenarians (100 year olds). Okinawa, Japan is one of those places, as discovered by bluezones.com. Just how much healthier were the people of Okinawa than those of use here in the good old USA?

source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17986602

As you can see in the chart above, made with data from 1995, the people of Okinawa were much healthier than individuals here in the USA or even their counterparts in mainland Japan. If you’ll notice I did say “were” healthier. Sadly, as our western culture has infiltrated this beautiful island, the younger generations have forgotten the ancient and healthy food culture of the Okinawan people. But just what is that culture and it’s benefits beyond that of longevity?

What is the Okinawa Diet?

The Okinawan Diet is an ancient way of eating for the people of Okinawa, Japan. Okinawa is located in the Ryukyu Islands of Japan.

The life expectancy in Japan is 84 versus the USA life expectancy of 78.8. With that said, Okinawa has more than 5 times as many centenarians as the rest of Japan. So, what is the secret? What is so different about the Okinawan way of life? How do Okinawans differ from the rest of Japan or the world for that matter? It all boils down to the Okinawan diet and lifestyle.

The Okinawa Diet: Living to 100

Nutritionfacts.org

What do Okinawans eat?

The Okinawa Diet is a whole food, plant based diet, rich in leafy greens, as well as yellow and orange vegetables. While they do eat rice, their main source of starch is purple sweet potatoes. They eat only small amounts of meat, mainly pork, and dairy. Legumes and soy are also emphasized in this anti-aging diet. The Okinawa diet contains relatively little processed food.

Health Benefits of the Okinawa Diet

  • Large amounts of anti-oxidants
  • naturally calorie restricted
  • low fat and low sugar
  • improved immunity
  • ant-aging
  • improved brain health – not only are Okinawan people among the longest living, they also have some of the lowest rates of dementia in the world!
  • lowers risk of heart disease
  • lowers risk of cancer
  • improved bone health

How you can eat the Okinawa Way

  • Practice Hara Hachi Bu – this translates to “eat until you are eight parts out of ten full.” This is a practice from Confucius that reminds us to stop eating when we are 80% full
  • Eat mindfully – In the west, we scarf down our food as if we haven’t eaten in weeks. It’s not uncommon to gobble up our food on the run or while driving. This is opposite of the Okinawa philosophy. Take your time and think about what and how you are eating. Think about your “satiety ” or fullness level.
  • 1200 calories per day – I highly doubt the ancient Okinawa people actually counted calories. However, when you base your diet on plants, you will naturally eat fewer calories. The main concept here is our 2000 calorie diet here in the west is far too much. There is more and more research showing the longevity and anti-aging benefits of a calorie restricted diet. For more information on calorie restriction, see my article on the CRON DIET.
  • Eat the rainbow – Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, of all colors. The colors of plants is what gives them specific nutrients not found in other foods. The more varied your diet, the more colorful your diet, the healthier it is.
  • Start eating sweet potatoes – they don’t have to be purple. Okinawan people eat all colors of sweet potatoes. These tasty gems are filled with fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B5, vitamin E and potassium.
  • Limited amounts of HIGH QUALITY protein – stay away from CAFO and mass produced forms of protein. Since you will be limiting the amount of protein, you’ll want to go for quality over quantity. Aim for wild caught seafood, grass fed beef, pastured chickens/eggs, and organic pork.
  • Limit grains and dairy – While the Okinawa diet does include dairy and limited amounts of rice, these foods are greatly limited. In fact, if not for the legumes, the Okinawa diet could be considered largely paleo in nature.

Closing thoughts

You don’t have to jump in with both feet, as we often try to do when changing our diet. Start gradually by implementing mindful eating. Add a few vegan meals to your week. Slowly begin to cut back on processed foods. You don’t have to go from eating the Standard American Diet 100% of the time to eating the Okinawa diet 100% of the time. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Use the 85/15 rule. Gradually work up to eating the Okinawa diet 85% of the, and allow yourself some fun foods 15% of the time.

Until next time, Namaste my friends.

Tamara

Sources

  1. https://draxe.com/nutrition/okinawa-diet/
  2. https://nutrineat.com/health-benefits-of-okinawa-diet
  3. https://www.nutrition-and-you.com/okinawa-diet.html
  4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/sweet-potatoes#vitamins-and-minerals

Middle-Age Wisdom: 9 Longevity Secrets from the Blue Zones

The life expectancy in the USA is 78.2 years of age. However, there are individuals all over the world that live to be 100+ years. What do they do differently than the rest of us? What are their secrets?

Sea, Horse, Meadow, Sky, Japan, Natural, Okinawa

The people from Blue Zone, together with National Geographic set out to find these answers. They found and studied the world’s longest lived people. Studies have revealed that only 20% of life-span is genetic, which leaves the remaining 80% down to lifestyle and diet. Knowing this, Blue Zone and National Geographic researchers worked with demographers (people who work with statistics) to find places around the world with the highest life expectance, or highest numbers of individuals who reached 100 years old. They found 5 places which met the criteria:

  1. Barbagia region of Sardinia
  2. Ikaria, Greece
  3. Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica
  4. Seventh Day Adventists
  5. Okinawa, Japan

The Power 9

This team consisted of medical researchers, anthropologists, demographers and epidemiologists. These scientists sifted through the data and found 9 common denominators among all 5 places, which they called “Power 9”. Here are the 9 things most of the world’s centenarians do to live long and healthy lives.

Meditation, Man, Meditate, Rest, Yoga, Moonlight, Moon
  1. Move Naturally– This doesn’t mean you have to go to the gym everyday, although you can if that’s what you enjoy. It means find natural ways to be active everyday. It may surprise you, but blue zone centenarians don’t lift weights or run endlessly. According to Blue Zones, all of these 100 year olds had one thing in common-they “moved naturally”. These people grow gardens or walk. They don’t have the modern conveniences that we have here for gardens and yard work.
  2. Have a purpose – What is your reason for waking up every morning?
  3. Down shift – Blue zone centenarians all have a way to deal with stress, something we aren’t good at here in the west. Do daily yoga and meditation – Research from India suggests that daily yoga and meditation have anti-aging properties. In other words, they help “turn back the clock”. Studies show that they help reverse cellular aging. Researchers think this is because it reduces the body’s stress response.
  4. The 80% rule – Here in the west, it’s common for us to “pig out” or eat until we feel like we’ll burst. However Blue Zone centenarians eat until they are 80% full, which could be the difference between losing weight and gaining it. Eat smallest meal in the evening. They then don’t eat for the remainder of the day. In a way, this is a form of intermittent fasting, which research has shown to have anti-aging effects on the body.
  5. Plant slant Blue zone centurions eat a plant based diet. Beans, are the main aspect of centenarian diets. Meat—mostly pork—is eaten on approximately five times per month.  Serving sizes are 3-4 oz., about the size of a deck of cards.
  6. Wine at 5 – Almost all blue zone Centenarians drink alcohol in moderation. In fact, it may surprise you to know that those who drink moderately actually outlive those who don’t drink at all. Limiting drinks to 1 or 2 glasses per day, preferably wine, seems key.
  7. Belong – Most of the blue zone centurions interviewed belonged to some kind of “faith-based” community. Denomination was irrelevant. Attending a faith service 4x per month added, on average, 4-14 years of life.
  8. Loved ones first – Blue zone centenarians kept aging parents or grandparents near by, or in their home. They also commit to a life partner and invest heavily in time and love for their children.
  9. The right tribe – Centenarians lived with people who supported healthy behaviors. Research suggests that behavior, good or bad, is contagious. A social network can affect your behavior, so choose wisely.
Agriculture, Asia, China, Farm, Harvest, Cottage, Land

Closing thoughts

We in the west love our modern conveniences and our technology. We like to make things as easy for ourselves as possible. It turns out that may be harming us more than helping us.

We are also beginning to live longer here in the west, However, not because of lifestyle, but due to advances in the medical industry. We aren’t healthier though. In fact, it’s just the opposite. We are heavier than man has ever been in history and plagued with chronic disease. As we age, we are plagued with chronic disease, heart disease, cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. All of these were rare just 100 years ago. We are living longer in spite of this and in spite of our fast food, and technology laden lives. Medicine cabinets filled with prescription bottles has become the norm for people in the west as we age.

We need to take a long hard look at how we are living and how we want our lives to look as we age. Do we want lives filled with chronic disease and handfuls of pills? Or do we want to live happy, healthy productive lives that are disease free? For me the choice is easy. We need to take a step back and learn from the centenarians in the blue zones.

Until next time, namaste my friends

Tamara

Source

  1. https://www.bluezones.com/2016/11/power-9/

The Insomnia Fix: Circadian Rhythm ~ Winding Your Internal Clock

Did you know…

  • 50-70 million American adults have a sleep disorder.
  • 4.7% reported falling asleep while driving at least one time in the past 30 days.
  • Insomnia is the most common specific sleep disorder.
  • Short bouts are reported by about 30% of adults and long term chronic insomnia is reported by 10%.
  • 35.3% adults report less than 7 hours of sleep each day.
  • 100,000 deaths occur each year in US hospitals due to medical errors with sleep deprivation a contributing factor.

Melatonin, also known by most people as “the sleep hormone”, is an important and master hormone in the body. Insomnia is one symptom of melatonin deficiency. The main cause of melatonin deficiency is a faulty circadian clock (CC) or circadian rhythm.

What is the circadian rhythm?

Every organ, cell and gene is part of the CC, but, the cycle itself is run by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). This is a collection of 20,000 cells located in the hypothalamus at the center of the base of the brain.

The SCN is indirectly connected to several glands throughout the body, including the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, thyroid gland, the reproductive system and the pineal gland.

The SCN is essential to the health and daily rhythm of the body. ALL cellular activity throughout the body occurs in a circadian rhythm, including energy, metabolism, energy or nutrient sensing, maintenance, repair, division, communication and secretion. In order to have healthy body, and healthy melatonin production, it is necessary to have a healthy circadian clock. As you can see, a healthy SCN is necessary for the healthy functioning of the human body.

The light dark cycle

MELATONIN RELEASE

Light and darkness are at the core of SCN and CC functioning. As daylight penetrates the retina, the SCN signals the pineal gland to stop producing melatonin, speeds breathing, increases the heart rate and raises the body temperature. Upon opening the eyes, the digestive motility increases and the adrenals release cortisol to energize the body and increase alertness.

In the evening, as darkness sets in, the body prepares for sleep by dropping the body temperature and producing and releasing melatonin.

What disrupts the light/dark cycle?

As you can see, the light/dark cycle is essential to a healthy SCN and the proper functioning of the CC. So, what activities disrupt this important cycle?

  • Improper lighting at the wrong time of day will disrupt the circadian clock.
  • Bright screens, electronics, blue light and bright light at night create insomnia by delaying melatonin production.
  • Indoor light during the day is not bright enough, when compared to proper outdoor sunlight. In other words, when we spend our entire days under indoor, artificial light, we are not getting enough light, because outdoor light is much more intense and necessary to proper SCN/CC functioning.

How to wind your internal clock

If you’re suffering from insomnia, the first thing you need to do is ensure that your SCN/CC is functioning properly. Here are some tips:

  • Make sure you’re sleepy when you climb in bed.
  • Don’t toss and turn. Give yourself 20 minutes to fall asleep. After that, get up and do something quiet, like reading a book.
  • Stay away from electronics, and bright screens. Establish a relaxing bedtime routine.
  • Don’t eat, watch television or work on the computer while in your room. Your bedroom is only for sleeping and sex.
  • Your bedroom should be dark and quiet. Keep it at a cool temperature.
  • Avoid bright lights at night.
  • Stay away from electronics 30 to 60 minutes before your scheduled bedtime.
  • Don’t eat right before bed. It’s best to eat at least 2 – 3 hours before bed.
  • Spend time outside, in sunlight everyday, or as often as possible.
  • Exercise regularly improves sleep quality. Individuals of all ages fall asleep faster and sleep better with regular physical activity
  • Only drink caffeine in the morning. Caffeine takes up to 9 hours to dissipate from your system.
  • Avoid consuming alcohol before bedtime.
  • Reduce your fluid intake before bedtime.
  • The SCN/CC love schedules and regularity. Eat meals at the same time every day. When meals are set on a regular schedule, the CC functions more efficiently.
  • Eat a diet high in foods containing melatonin and tryptophan, a precursor to melatonin.

Closing thoughts

When researching the SCN and Circadian Rhythm for my thesis, I came across a wonderful and user friendly book called the Circadian Code by: Satchin Panda. Dr. Panda, is a professor at the Salk Institute and a founding member of the Center for Circadian Biology at the University of California, San Diego (Panda, 2018). Dr. Panda’s first breakthrough was as a member of the team that discovered blue light sensors in the retina, which signal the brain when it is morning or night .

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Despite his scientific background, Dr. Satchin does a great job explaining the SCN and CC. His explanations are well presented and easy to understand. If you are having trouble sleeping, with a brief bout of insomnia, or maybe even dealing with chronic insomnia, I highly recommend his book With that said, his book isn’t just for people suffering insomnia. In fact, everyone should read it, knowing how important the SCN/CC is to the very functioning our our entire body.

Until next time…Namaste my friends!

Tamara

Brain Talks: Fighting to remember ~ Melatonin & Alzheimer’s Disease (Part 1)

Did you know…

  • One person in the United States develops Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) every 65 seconds.
  • Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth leading cause of death.
  • 5.8 million Americans are living with AD, with this number expected to reach 14 million by the year 2050.
  • Deaths from AD increased by 145 percent between 2000 to 2017
  • Approximately one in three seniors (65 years or older) die from AD or some form of dementia, more than breast and prostate cancer combined.
  • There is currently NO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT for this devastating disease.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease, see this Brain Talks article: A Beginner’s Guide to Alzheimer’s Disease.

Part of my master’s thesis was showing the benefits of melatonin, in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, I’m going to share a bit of that information with all of you. There’s a lot of information, so, I’ve decided to break this into a 2 part series. This article discusses melatonin. In part 2, we’ll discuss phytomelatonin (plant based melatonin) and safe supplement sources.

What is melatonin?

Before I get to phytomelatonin, it’s important to know about melatonin. You have more than likely heard of this hormone as a key to healthy sleep, which is very true. However, It’s far more important to the body than a sleep hormone, which is what I discovered in my thesis research.

Melatonin, N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a neurotransmitter produced by the pineal gland. Other melatonin producing sites can be found in the retina and throughout the digestive system. However, melatonin produced in the pineal gland is known to be more powerful and concentrated than is produced elsewhere in the body.

Pineal produced melatonin is also the substance used to regulate the circadian rhythm and internal body clock.

The primary function of melatonin is regulation of the daily light/dark cycles within the body. This light-dark cycle, or circadian clock, controls the production of melatonin. Melatonin is produced from tryptophan, which is converted into serotonin. Through a light-dependent process, part of that serotonin is sent to the pineal gland, where it is converted into melatonin.

Melatonin is then slowly released in the evening, as darkness approaches. This release increases throughout the night, reaching a peak between 2:00 and 4:00 a.m.

In my previous Brain Talks article, I discussed Alzheimer’s disease and possible causes. Here’s a reminder of five main lifestyle causes:

  • Chronic inflammation
  • Insulin resistance
  • Brain supporting nutrient deficiencies
  • Toxins
  • Oxidation

Benefits of Melatonin

As I discovered in my research, Melatonin is a wonder hormone. Here are just some of the wonderful things it does in relation to the 5 causes of Alzheimer’s disease:

INFLAMMATION

  • Melatonin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent, especially in regard to age-related neuroinflammation, as is seen in Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Melatonin down regulates or stops the of proinflammatory process. (slows it down)
  • These age-related anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin also extend to other parts of the body including the liver, pancreas and lungs.
  • The most important benefit of Melatonin in relation to Alzheimer’s is: Melatonin also inhibits the secretion of amyloid plaque, seen in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

INSULIN RESISTANCE

  • Melatonin decreases insulin secretion.
  • Insulin is made in the pancreas. Melatonin receptors, known as MT-1 and MT-2, are present on pancreatic cells.
  • Melatonin stops insulin from being produced. Melatonin activates these MT-1 and MT-2 receptors, which stop two insulin stimulating messengers, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP).

HORMONE BALANCE

  • Melatonin is known as “the regulator of regulators.”
  • One function of melatonin is to regulate the levels of all other hormones.
  • Melatonin maintains homeostasis or balance throughout the body by fine tuning the levels of other hormones.
  • Melatonin is known to directly regulate the production of thyroid hormones.
  • Melatonin is also known to boost production of BDNF – Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor, which stimulates the growth of new neurons. As you might imagine, this is important for Alzheimer’s disease.

TOXINS AND OXIDATION

  • Melatonin is a powerful and effective of antioxidant and anti-toxin agent.
  • Melatonin directs free-radical scavenging throughout the body.
  • The many protective benefits of melatonin include: the reduction of free-radicals, the regulation of immune responses, reduction of toxic substances and protection for the liver.

Melatonin Deficiency

Melatonin production decreases with age: a 10 year old produces thirty to fifty percent more melatonin than a 60 year old. Research indicates that individuals with Alzheimer’s disease have lower melatonin levels than peers of the same age. This deficit is seen by Alzheimers researchers as a contributing factor in the development of the disease. Some other causes of Melatonin deficiency include:

  • A malfunctioning circadian clock
  • There is some evidence that Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMF) affect melatonin production
  • Zinc and Magnesium deficiency – these minerals are needed in the production and secretion of melatonin.
  • Some drugs inhibit production including: caffeine, NSAIDS (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs), Beta blockers

What happens when you’re Melatonin deficient?

EFFECTS:

  • Sleep disturbances
  • Increased risk of heart disease
  • Increased risk of cancer
  • Insulin resistance
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Alzheimer disease
  • Parkinson disease
  • Schizophrenia

SYMPTOMS:

  • Restless legs
  • Sleep problems/insomnia
  • Moodiness or depression
  • Intestinal problems
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Increased aging

Closing thoughts

As you can see, melatonin is much more than just a sleep hormone. It is a master hormone, a regulator of regulators. It controls other hormones, levels of inflammation, Alzheimer’s causing amyloid plaque to name just a few. In the next issue of Brain Talks, I’ll touch on phytomelatonin, which is plant based melatonin and safe sources of this whole food supplement.

We covered a lot of science in today’s article. Let me know if you have any questions.

Until next time, Namaste my friends!

Tamara

Sources

!. Arnao, M.B., and Hernandez-Ruiz, J., (2018). Phytomelatonin versus synthetic melatonin in cancer treatments. Biomedical Research and Clinical Practice DOI: 10.15761/BRCP.1000170

2. Baltaci, A.K., Mogulkoc, R., and Baltaci, S.B., (2019). Review: The role of zinc in the endocrine system. Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Science. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30772815

3. Bredesen, D.E., (2017). The end of Alzheimer’s: The first program to prevent and reverse cognitive decline. Penguin-Random House: New York, New York.

4. Esteban-Zubero, E., Alatorre-Jimenez, M.A., Lopez-Pingarron, L., Reyes-Gonzales, M.C., Almeida-Souza, P., Cantin-Golet, A., Ruiz-Ruiz, F.J., Tan, D.X., Garcia, J.J., and Reiter, R.J. (2015). Melatonin’s role in preventing toxinrelated and sepsis-mediated hepatic damage: A review. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2016.01.018

5. Feeney, K.A., Hansen, L.L., Putker, M., Olivares-Yanez, C., Day, J., Eades, L., Larrondo, L.F., Hoyle, N.P., O’Neill, J.S., Van Ooijen, G., (2016). Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance. Nature.DOI: 10.1038/nature17407

6. Garcia-Marin, R., Fernandez-Santos, J.M., Morillo-Bernal, J., Gordillo-Martinez, F., Vazquez-Roman, V., Utrilla, J.C., Carrillo-Vico, A., Guerrero, J.M., and Martin-LaCave, I., (2015) Melatonin in the thyroid gland: regulation by thyroidstimulating hormone and role in thyroglobulin gene expression. Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology. Retrieved from: http://www.jpp.krakow.pl/journal/archive/10_15/pdf/643_10_15_article.pdf

7. Hardeland, R., (2018). Melatonin and inflammation: story of a double-edged blade. Journal of Pineal Research. DOI: 10.1111/jpi.12525

8. Luo, Y., Peng, M., and Wei, H, (2017) Melatonin Promotes Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression and Anti-Apoptotic Effects in Neonatal Hemolytic Hyperbilirubinemia via a Phospholipase (PLC)-Mediated Mechanism. DOI: 10.12659/MSM.907592

9. Mackenzie, G., (2016). Symptoms Of Melatonin. Retrieved from: http://rxeconsult.com/healthcare-articles/Symptoms-Of-Melatonin-Deficiency-1059/

10. Panda, S., (2018). The circadian code. Rodale Books. Crown Publishing: New York, New York.

11. Peschke, E., Bahr, I., and Muhlbauer, E., (2013). Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon. DOI:10.3390/ijms14046981

12. Peuhkurl, K., Sihyola, N., and Korpela, R., (2012). Dietary factors and fluctuating levels of melatonin. Food and Nutrition Research. DOI: https://DOI.org/10.3402/fnr.v56i0.17252

13. Pierpaoli, W., Regelson, W., and Colman, C. (1996). The melatonin miracle: Nature’s age- reversing, disease fighting, sex enhancing hormone. Pocket Books: New York, New York.

14. Reiter, R.J., and Robinson, J. (1995). Melatonin: Breakthrough discoveries that can help you combat aging; boost your immune system; reduce your risk of cancer and heart disease; get a better night’s sleep. Bantom Books: New York, New York.

15. Reiter, R.J., Tan, D.X., Manchester, L.C., Simopoulos, A.P., Maldonado, M.D., Flores, L.J., and Terron, F.M., (2007). Melatonin in Edible Plants (Phytomelatonin): Identification, Concentrations, Bioavailability and Proposed Functions. World

Review of Nutrition and Dietetics. DOI: 10.1159/000097917

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cross-section- vector-1097435732?studio=

Brain Talks: 20 Foods to Boost Memory and Heal the Brain

While research into Alzheimer’s disease has failed to turn up any useful or working “cures”, we do know that the disease begins to develop a full 20 years before symptoms occur. As we approach middle-age, many things begin to slow down, as aches and pains appear. Worrying about our memory is the last thing we need.

Social Health Quotes. QuotesGram

Can healing our brain be as simple as changing our diet? YES! What all of that Alzheimer’s disease research HAS shown is that brain diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, are almost entirely preventable. So, with that said, it’s never too soon to begin boosting your memory and healing your brain. Whether you’re 8 years old or 80 years old, everyone should be including brain healthy foods in their daily diet. Here is a list of the top 20: (1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

  1. Avocado – Known to protect the body from high blood pressure, avocados are high in healthy monounsaturated fats. These creamy fruits are also high in vitamin K and folate, which help prevent blood clots in the brain
  2. Eggs – Eggs are high in choline, a precursor to an important neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Eggs also contain cholesterol, which is a fundamental component of brain cell membranes.
  3. Coconut oil – Provides the brain with essential saturated fats, needed for brain cell nutrition and function. It also enhances the brain’s ability to use energy.
  4. Dark Chocolate – Are you surprised by this one? Dark chocolate is rich in flavonoids which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also high in polyphenols which boost blood flow in the brain.
  5. Pumpkin seeds – Rich in zinc, magnesium, copper and iron, pumpkin seeds boost memory, reduce brain fog, as well as improve nerve signaling and brain function.
  6. Kale – Yes, you knew this had to make one of my lists. While I tried to avoid putting it on this list, it turns out this powerful leafy green was on almost every list of brain foods I found in my research. Why? It is a low carb veggie that is rich in potassium, iron, along with vitamins C, K and A, all needed for a healthy brain.
  7. Extra Virgin Olive Oil – This was another food on several lists. EVOO is rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, known to improve memory and learning, as well as reverse age-related brain disease. It is known to help fight off the toxic proteins that lead to Alzheimer’s disease.
  8. Sea vegetables – These foods, mostly neglected by those of us who live in the west, are among the healthiest foods on the planet. Sea vegetables contain all 56 minerals essential for human health in a readily bioavailable form (6). They are a rich source of iodine. They are also high in tyrosine, a precursor to dopamine. It turns out they contain taurine, an amino acid that stimulates the release of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid).
  9. Fermented foods – When your gut is healthy, your brain is healthy. Fermented foods help build a healthy microbiome and digestive tract. Science now sees the the digestive tract and microbiome as the “second brain”. Studies show that a dysfunctional digestive system is the root cause for many brain disorders including: ADHD, anxiety, autism, depression, carb cravings, memory loss, concentration problems, and chronic inflammation of the brain.
  10. Exercise – Known as “food for the soul”, exercise turns on genes that make Brain-derived neurotrophic factor that targets brain cells.
  11. All 10 anti-inflammatory foods from this list. Last week I posted a list of 10 anti-inflammatory foods. It turns out, these same foods are on almost all brain food lists, according to my research and for good reason. Inflammation is the key to disease in the brain. Many of the toxic proteins that develop in Alzheimer’s disease develop when the brain tries to protect itself from out of control chronic inflammation. Most of the following foods turned up on one or more of the “brain foods” lists during my research.
  • green leafy vegetables
  • blueberries
  • broccoli
  • turmeric
  • green tea
  • beets
  • pineapple
  • nuts (mainly walnuts and almonds)
  • wild caught salmon
  • bone broth
11 Facts You Need To Know About Your Brain | Strategy Lab ...

Closing thoughts

Again and again, my research turns up irrefutable evidence that simply eliminating toxic refined foods and turning to a whole food diet goes a long way toward a healthy brain and a healthy life. That really is what a brain healthy diet is all about: eliminating what causes inflammation and cell death, while feeding the brain foods to heal and grow.

Whole Foods Quotes: best 13 famous quotes about Whole Foods

Until next time…Namaste my friends

Tamara

Sources

  1. https://draxe.com/nutrition/15-brain-foods-to-boost-focus-and-memory/
  2. https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-21756/20-foods-to-naturally-increase-your-brain-power.html
  3. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324044.php#soy-products
  4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-brain-foods#section11
  5. https://www.flintrehab.com/2019/foods-that-heal-the-brain-after-concussion/
  6. https://bebrainfit.com/brain-foods/
  7. https://thepurplealmond.com/2019/11/12/the-wellness-mindset-physical-wellness-fight-inflammation-by-using-these-top-10-anti-inflammatory-foods/