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How To Cut a Spaghetti Squash

As a continuation of my earlier blog Thoughts while trying to cut open a spaghetti squash | Herding Cats, I wanted to discuss how to actually get one open. During my research, so many people had wonderful sounding spaghetti squash recipes, which simply started out with the phrase “Cut the squash in half.” Well, as we’ve been discussing, this is easier said than done. To help us out, I found a few videos from the experts on just how to cut those darn things open.

Clean & Delicious: If you don’t mind using the microwave, the method below, is by far the best method. The best part of it: you cut it AFTER it’s cooked, when it’s nice and soft. This method works best if you simply wish to use the squash as pasta substitute. If, however, you have a recipe that requires roasting, as many of them do, this method wouldn’t work as well. On second thought, you could, microwave it until it was just a little soft, to aid in the cutting process, before roasting.

Melissa Joulwan: Melissa illustrates the “scoring” method, while  the squash is on a towel. She makes it look relatively easy, and takes her about 2:30 minutes.

Tundra Restaurant Supply: In about 1:10, using a serrated knife, he had the stem end cut off and the squash split open. Cutting the stem end off gave him a stable surface with which to work. The serrated knife easily cut through the outer shell. You can hear the rest of the shell crack in half. There was very little cutting involved.

Well, I don’t think the technique matters as much as the tools you use. In my experience cutting open ANY squash requires a good, very sharp, knife. I personally prefer the serrated knife and use the 3rd method with great success.

Now that we’ve seen a few examples of how to actually get a spaghetti squash open, stay tuned, later today, for some recipes, as well as alternatives to spaghetti squash.

(Source: Featured pictures are courtesy of: Avalon Organic Gardens and Eco Village, Melissa Joulwan’s Well Fed and Pen & Fork)

About Tamara Hoerner (726 Articles)
I am a student at Hawthorn University working toward a MS degree in Holistic Nutrition. For me, the name Purple Almond symbolizes “Good, nutritious, whole food bringing light and life to the body, awakening the inherent healing mechanisms within.”

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